Tag Archive | technology

Warning for all high school graduates

Since the first days of September, you’ve been thinking about graduation day, but more, perhaps, as a closing, and rightly so. It’s the end of a phase of your education and life. Now things will change. These changes will be far from subtle as were the ones from grade to grade. They will be drastic in comparison, and they’ll come at you fast.

Remember the sing-songy mantra you used to chant at the beginning of summer vacation? “No more pencils, no more books, no more teachers’ dirty looks”? In one sense, your dreams have come true. Seriously. Even if you’re going on to college, those days are gone. Nothing will be the same. Sure, you’ll have classes with pencils (now replaced by technology) and books (now coming with huge price tags and little resale value), but the classroom will change. The teacher’s dirty looks will no longer come as a result of mischievous behavior. Instead, they will challenge your previous 18 years at the core and possibly the entire foundation of your life, especially if you are a Christian or hold traditional values. Are you ready?

Many college professors project a persona of having all of the answers and view you as an unenlightened blank page on which to write their agenda. Their goal is not to see you learn to think so that you can become the innovators of tomorrow; rather, they want you to join them as they espouse their theories of the way the world should be based not on lofty ideals or fact, but on failed programs from the past. Their goal? Land you like a fish – hook, line and sinker. Are you ready?

One thing you’ll learn in your history classes is history repeats itself because people ignore the results achieved the first time around. Sometimes they just rewrite it altogether. I achieved my degree a lot later in life and watched professors distort facts about some of the time periods I had already lived through as an adult. This coupled with the way they changed the events themselves helped me recognize what they could do to young people unless they were prepared. Some of the sources they quoted had fancy names, but no real quantitative results to substantiate their data. To be fair, some of these proponents are only repeating what they had been taught and likely had not done their own research. If I were just coming out of high school, however, I might not have been as well prepared to see through their views. Are you ready?

With today’s ready access to technology, you have resources available to challenge the best classroom orators. Don’t be so quick to toss out your core values. God does not change nor do His principles. If you want to know truth, go to the source. The Bible will not take you down the wrong path. Are you ready?

Just for fun, check out this video to see how things used to be, why they were that way and how things are changing. You or even your parents, just might be a part of making a real difference. BTW — CONGRATULATIONS!

What happens when the power goes off?

I’ll deal with the first thoughtful responses to the title question up front.

Although we can join the debate about whether the population spikes 9 months following a major power outage or whether the number of births is well within the norm, that’s not really where I’m headed with this one. I’m talking about the power that runs today’s technological devices we so depend on. What happens when those resources are not available? Here’s why I ask.

During a power outage, I went into a local store hoping to make a purchase. Unfortunately, the clerk did not know how to compute the change needed from the cash tendered without the aid of the cash register. Counting on her fingers, she struggled several times, but I finally had to tell her. She could not get it right.  It was not a matter of being inconvenient to perform calculations by hand. The root problem stemmed from the fact that she had not learned the skill.

Recently, I tutored an extremely bright twenty-something’s man preparing for an entrance exam. He had no problem solving quadratic equations and understood higher math concepts, so why did he need to find a coach? He had never learned how to do long division. He was unable to solve these problems without a calculator, and the rules did not permit using one during the test. None of his elementary teachers had taught him this skill.

There are more benefits gained from using the left side of the brain than mere academic exercises.  Learning math facts like the multiplication tables and grasping other concepts prepare you to think clearly to make other decisions and analyze situations. It also keeps the brain agile and sharp during the senior years. Certainly using technology makes the job easier, but if it’s not available, could you go it alone?

But here’s the more important question. Do you know what the local schools are teaching – or not teaching? Perhaps you should check it out, and don’t stop with just math. You might want to investigate other subjects like history and writing. This would be good to find out before we’re all left in the dark.

Just send me an email

God does not send email, though in the busyness of our lives, wouldn’t it be helpful if He did? How great would that be for us? If, when we were tempted in thought or deed, the software’s application ding would alert us, “You’ve got mail.” The Lord could use the red exclamation point to indicate a really important message and highlight the main problem in the subject line so that we could read just that part if we were really pressed for time. The body of the email could contain pertinent details and a bulleted action plan for us to follow to avoid sin or accomplish some great work on His behalf.

How would we respond to His communications? Would we scan it to see which ones we really wanted to open? Would we read the subject line to determine whether or not we even wanted to bother opening it? Would we drag it into one of our files to read it later only to have later never come? Would we look at it and treat it like Spam? Would we become overwhelmed or discouraged?

Fortunately for us, the Lord does not send email. If He did, the application ding would be constant and deafening. The web networks would crash from overload and every email would be from Him with a red exclamation point preceding the subject line. The Lord is not interested in using our manmade technology to communicate with us. He’s created nature and inspired the Scriptures to tell us all that we need. And, He’s gone one step better. He’s given those who have accepted His free gift of salvation, the indwelling Holy Spirit.  The Holy Spirit bears witness with our spirit that we are children of God  , and He helps our weakness, for we do not know how to pray as we should. The Spirit Himself intercedes for us with groaning too deep for words. He intercedes for the saints according to the will of God.

No, God does not use email. He has a much more efficient tool. The question is, will we listen?