Tag Archive | presentation

A babe speaks out about the Presidential election

Babe? No, I’m not talking about a hot looking woman; rather, I am referring to those who are considered too immature to count or have an opinion that matters. Yet this 13-year old young lady demonstrates that there is hope for the future. In fulfillment of a class project, Jenny makes a great case by looking at the track records of presidential hopefuls Barack Obama and Mitt Romney and gives each of them a grade based on their performance – novel concept. Looks to me like she’s already moved beyond the elementary teachings as she ably researched and organized her information to deliver it in a comprehensive and easy-to-understand format.  As a former teacher, I’d give her an A.

You may have seen this youtube video in other blogs, but I think it bears repeating for several reasons:

  • Jenny did an excellent job. We need to recognize and affirm our young people for excellent performance so that they will continue to move forward. It does not help anyone, especially the children, when you keep passing them on so that they won’t feel sad or unworthy. Instead commend them when they do well so they’ll learn to accept responsibility to do better or continue on their forward trek.
  • Jenny was more professional in her presentation than many adults in business today. Not only was she neat in her appearance, but she smiled and presented her information in a clear and concise manner. Obviously the debates were not her model.
  • Jenny was articulate in her speech – unless I missed it, there were no “Yo’s or dudes” in the entire presentation. She prepared her material, primarily factual, in an interesting, relatable manner. Everyone could “get it.”
  • Jenny had excellent mentors. Sounds like Mrs. Jackson and her father have accepted their responsibility and opportunity to teach her well including the newest technology.
  • Jenny made some outstanding points.

I’ve seen some comments related to this video stating that a 13 year old was incapable of producing a video of this quality. Maybe the commenter’s kids went to inferior schools. I have 3 grandchildren who could produce an equally professional video, but then they have parents who encourage them to do their best.

Want to watch it again? Click here:  http://youtu.be/prmGb1o3dcQ

Kudos to Yasniger for sharing this information.

Debatable results

Last night we viewed the last of the election debates between President Obama and Governor Romney, and the winner was – one more time – the candidate of your choice before you turned on the TV or watched online. Did either of the candidates change anyone’s mind? I think that one’s debatable.

One thing I observed this time is that Mr. Obama may have gained a measure of respect for the debate process as he curbed his tendency toward interruptions. How can interested citizens possibly hear through the name calling and comments sufficiently to discern which plan makes sense when one candidate can’t control his tongue long enough for his opponent to explain his version? Maybe that’s the plan. Because time is short, grab all the minutes you can. That way, no one will be able to hear anything but your side. Hmmm, didn’t we get bad marks for this in elementary school?

Evidently Rachel Martin of NPR did her homework and found out that indeed there are rules for these debates – lots of them. In her article, Turns Out There are Rules for the Debates. Lots, she tells us there are 21 pages of rules. Maybe that’s the problem. There are just too many regulations and not enough time to read and understand all of them let alone follow them. I guess it’s just easier to ignore them.  Does that go along with the line elementary school students use? You know the one, “the dog ate my homework.”

It seems to me, the Presidential debates, rather than being an opportunity to hear a clear, concise presentation of each side’s viewpoints and perspectives, have become an extension of the negative ad campaigns that have been frequenting the airwaves, tweets and other social media.  It appears it’s much easier to point your finger at someone else instead of intelligently explaining your position. Didn’t we learn that in elementary school, too? I think it was in detention not history class.

I’m beginning to think that perhaps Presidential debates have outlived their usefulness. They are more of an embarrassment than enlightenment. Maybe they should go the way of the cassette, typewriter and other outdated technology. I guess that’s debatable, too.

Get a quote

How do you improve your writing, presentation or conversation to prove a point or engage your audience? One way is to add a quotation.

Using a quotation from a renowned and reputable source to introduce your topic can enhance and strengthen your message whether presented verbally or in written format. When you use this technique, it brings the credibility of the  author of the quote to your words almost as if that person were standing beside you resting his/her hand on your shoulder in support.

The operative word here is renowned. If you plan to use a quote, make sure the person’s name is almost a household word. Jesus, George Washington, Abraham Lincoln and Walt Disney can serve as prime examples of names most everyone will recognize. Other people who may have held prominent positions in business, government or religion may not be as readily recognized. In this case you may need to qualify their name by using a title as in Calvin Coolidge, 30th President. The title of President should resonate with your audience, and his words will then substantiate your own.

One word of caution, which is a fundamental step in preparing any material: consider your audience. In today’s global market place, you may be writing primarily for those within the United States, and in this case, the title President is sufficient. If, however, you are using the quote for something like web content, you will want to provide the name of the country to help your readers understand without further research. You do not want them scratching their heads wondering, “President of what?”

This brings a third group to the forefront. These are subject matter experts with proven track records but with a lesser-known name. (Your mother might fall into this category.) In this case, you may need to supplement the title with a few details to demonstrate their expertise. Online, you can also link the name to an appropriate site containing biographical or pertinent information.

Using quotations can be an effective means to establish credibility to support your ideas and engage your audience quickly. Although you may not choose to introduce every written piece or presentation with a quote, it is a valuable and timeless tool. There are online resources, but you might want to begin your own file of worthy statements so you can easily get a quote to fill your need.