Tag Archive | music

Creative types: Take heed

Do numbers scare you? Do they threaten to rob you of the joy you experience from the creative process? If you’re an entrepreneur, freelancer or involved in a home-based business, take heed.

One of the most important things you can do is accurately record your time and expenses on a regular basis. I know, I know. The creative juices need to have free reign so that ides will flow for your writing project and your eyes and ears need to be every ready when that perfect photo or paint-worthy subject comes into view. And of course you need to be unencumbered when the inspiration for a new musical score comes to mind. Believe me, I get that, but keep in mind, starving artists of any genre profit no one.

Consider these next few words of caution as a new opportunity for your innovative world. Taking the time to develop a workable plan to record your material, time and travel expenses can help put food on the table and provide the means for you to continue your work. I can’t say that I’ve arrived at the perfect method, yet I am well on my way to a system that works for me. You need to find one that will serve your needs and lends itself to your personality and field of artistic expression. Regardless of your creative outlet, you’ll have three key elements to consider, and they’re as easy as ABC.

A = Awareness

Look around you to see how you are spending your time and money. Are you traveling to the store to pick up supplies? If so, capture your mileage and time spent as well as the material expense on your phone, iPad, journal or some other recordable option. The key factor is to realize how you are expending your resources so that you can leverage them for your economic advantage at tax time. As I mentioned in a previous post, Ron Mueller’s book, Home Business Tax Savings Made Easy, is an excellent resource to open your eyes to the right items to track.

B = Buddy

I hate filing, but I understand and appreciate the value of keeping receipts, etc. and having them readily accessible should I need them to track a purchase, locate a vendor, or prepare my taxes. One of my buddies is my husband. We call him Mr. Clean because he is a master at keeping tings orderly. (I drive him crazy.) Nevertheless, I give him the important paperwork, and he files them away using an envelope system until he needs them. The envelopes, a Franklin Planner or other method can also be your buddy. The key is to find what’s right for you.

C = Consistency 

In order for your creativity to flourish, you need to be able to support your efforts as effortlessly as possible. Just as slow and steady won the race for the tortoise, so consistent tracking will provide what you need when you need it without stress and without monetary loss.

As you begin with these simple steps, you’ll see ways to tweak it to your needs and specific projects. The goal is to be proactive and eliminate the starving artist syndrome.

Take another view

My daughter-in-law and her closest friend are stepping out in faith to open a new boutique in a small town in the Adirondacks. They are working hard to open this Saturday, and I have no doubt they’ll be successful, but this is not an unpaid advertisement for Pretty & Chic. Rather it is an observation that may be of help to any who are moving from enjoying a hobby to developing a business.

My daughter-in-law excelled at sewing and began crafting aprons as gifts for family and friends. As the recipient of one of the finished products, I can testify to both their beauty and quality. Because of the encouraging response she received, she wanted to offer them in her new store, but this meant having a supply of them on hand on opening day and required a brand new perspective. Instead of making one at a time and finishing it completely, she had to change up her process otherwise it would not be cost effective. Beginning slowly she discovered ways to streamline the way she cut out the pattern and assemble the pieces. Concentrating on the more difficult aspects first actually made the whole job easier.

Whether it’s sewing, writing, art, music, woodworking, tinkering with a new invention or some other favorite pastime, the point to all of this is that when you move to the professional category, you must experience a change in the way you think and the way you do things. You do not need to sacrifice the quality of your product, but you will need to reinvent the process so that you can make an income from your endeavor.

This may stretch your creative mind in new and different ways and be totally different from the way you started. Keep in mind the first time through may not be the best. Just persevere and try again. You may need to stand back and think it through several times before you realize the results you hoped for.  Yet once you achieve them, you’ll be glad you took another view.