Tag Archive | job

Can you find the perfect cheese?

I am still in the process of removing the stacks from my home office, but in so doing I found an insert from a book by Spencer Johnson, Who Moved My Cheese? In this quick read, Spencer spins his tale of two little mice that awaken one morning to find their cheese is missing. The cheese is an allegorical representation of those things we hold as a high priority for life like your job or perhaps an important relationship. Through their adventures to discover a new food supply, Spencer engagingly outlines the steps we all need to turn the challenge of change into the true opportunity it is. The insert contains 7 bullet points as a reminder of his key points. I think you’ll get the gist of the message. If not, you can get the book. The points are copied below:

  • Change happens – They keep moving the cheese
  • Anticipate change – Get ready for the cheese to move
  • Monitor change – Smell the cheese often so you know when it is getting old
  • Adapt to change quickly – The quicker you let go of old cheese, the sooner you can enjoy new cheese
  • Change – Move with the cheese
  • Enjoy change – Savor the adventure and the taste of new cheese!
  • Be ready to quickly change again and again – They keep moving the cheese

Spencer had a goldmine of an idea with this one. Today, not only is the original book still in demand, but he has created a specialized training curriculum for corporations using this material. Some of the more prominent companies use it with their employees. He’s also come up with specialized editions for teens and kids.

Now the book was very helpful as are the points listed above, but here’s the real question. Is it easier to learn from a story than it is from a list of points? It gets my vote because the bullet list triggered some detailed recollections of the tale, and I read it over 10 years ago. (Sometimes I cannot recall what I had for breakfast, so I’m thinking this is a stellar teaching tool.) Patrick Lencioni also uses this method of teaching business principles by illustrating them in a fictional format. Perhaps there are some who prefer Dragnet’s “Joe Friday” approach of “Just the facts, ma’am,” but the narrative accounts hold my interest and hence boost my retention.  If I understand the plan from the experience of two fictional mice and can remember it, I think I’ll be better able to adjust to change and find the perfect cheese.

Looking for a job?

In these days of economic uncertainty, more people are finding themselves out of work. In fact, in the US, there are now 12,806,000 former employees trying to feed their families and put a roof over their heads. Depending on your skill set and the number of others with similar capabilities, you may find it difficult to find a position in your field especially if the market is saturated. This situation may seem bleak, yet it could be a marvelous opportunity for you to reinvent yourself to find the job of your dreams. 

So where do you begin? Why not start with some self-probing questions? 

  • What do you REALLY want to do? What is preventing you from doing it?
  • What action could you take today to begin moving yourself in this direction?
  • What resources are available to you now?
  • Who do you know that is already doing this and who might be able to assist you? 

Many people who ask themselves these questions find that their previous position was really only a means to an end. They really would have preferred to do something totally different. If that’s true of you, you might want to pursue further education in order to acquire new skills. You might even decide to become an entrepreneur and develop something on your own. Kate Middleton’s mum started her own business when she couldn’t find party supplies for her children’s parties. 

What ideas do you have? Opportunity might be knocking on your door right now to pursue them. Will you go for it?