Tag Archive | Facebook

We’ve got today …

Kids-getting-on-school-busThis morning, I watched from my office window as the local school bus stopped to pick up the children to take them to school. I was too far away to see their faces, but I noticed more parents waiting with their children. Instead of making casual conversation with the other adults, they spoke to their kids and crossed the street with them to make sure they got safely on the bus. They lingered as the bus pulled away, perhaps wondering if this was how the parents of the children in Friday’s tragic shootings felt saying goodbyes to their kids. In their case, it was farewell.

We never know what tomorrow will bring, yet too often we humans bank on the fact that we will have a tomorrow and another one after that. Yet we have no guarantee. We often become paranoid and surround ourselves with protective devices or try to think ahead to prompt proactive behaviors. Although looking ahead and trying to remain safe are wise actions, we could easily go overboard. The bottom line is that it is out of our control, but our faith in the Lord must remain strong.

If one thing good is to come out of this sad tragedy, it might be what I saw demonstrated this morning and see on so many Facebook posts. Treasure the people in our lives now. We’ve got today.

Do testimonials influence readers?

I heard an interesting conversation today. Someone mentioned he found testimonials distasteful and did not pay any attention to those offered to promote products or services. Rather, this person felt that the company’s reputation, brand name and price were the only important factors. Do you think he is right?

We’ve all seen ads making magnanimous claims like the ones about losing 30 pounds in a ridiculously short stretch of time. Seriously, we know it can’t be for real. But here’s the real question. Do we throw the baby out with the bath water? In other words, are all testimonials fraudulent?

Actually, we’re bombarded by testimonials and are influenced by them all the time. Yes, we’re talking those promoting products or services that we might buy, and we think nothing of it. Have you ever gone to a new restaurant based on a recommendation of a friend of a friend. You know, “My friend, Sam, said it was really a great place to go and the meal was …” Well, you get the idea. What about the TV commercials featuring prominent athletes endorsing a certain athletic shoe or cereal? If Roy Halladay (Philadelphia Phillies) likes it, you want it too. Speaking of likes, what about Facebook? If Aunt Sally from Seattle likes Walmart, you might too, especially if she’s your favorite relative. And what about product ratings based on reviewers we’ve never met? Don’t we appreciate knowing the number of stars a product has garnered especially when shopping online?

Marketers understand that an endorsement from a reliable source may bring a buyer to the tipping point. It may be a way of answering those frequently asked questions without the pain of wading through a lengthy list. There’s no doubt about it, stories sell. Just look at the evening news along with their commercials. The issue likely has less to do with marketers using testimonials, and if we’re honest, more to do with our not wanting to take the time to do our due diligence and evaluate the facts on our own. Isn’t that why we continually buy our favorite brands? We’ve tried them and like them, so now we don’t have to think when we go to the store to restock.

We are influenced everyday by what others recommend. Testimonials do add value, so don’t be turned off. Instead read and evaluate the message. Then come to your own conclusion.

How to sell a mousetrap

There’s a measure of truth in the old adage, “If you build a better mousetrap, they’ll beat a path to your door.” How does this happen? The answer is word of mouth. 

It’s simple really. One person tells another how much he liked or benefited from your product or service. That person recommends it to someone else who also touts its attributes to another until the path to your door has become well-worn. No high pressure sales and no high-priced ad campaigns. It’s just one proverbial beggar telling another where to get bread. 

Enter social media. Now if someone likes your mousetrap, she (or he) can post it on Facebook so that 487 of her closest friends see it. Respecting her and her opinions, these comrades just may give it a try and then tell 287 of their nearest and dearest friends their thoughts – good or bad. With social media the cycle continues within minutes. You do the math. If the comments are positive, it won’t take long for folks from all over the world to be beating a virtual path to your door. 

Whether you’re helping your child sell Girl Scout cookies and popcorn or marketing a new line of cars, social media is a viable marketing strategy.