Tag Archive | challenge

Can you find the perfect cheese?

I am still in the process of removing the stacks from my home office, but in so doing I found an insert from a book by Spencer Johnson, Who Moved My Cheese? In this quick read, Spencer spins his tale of two little mice that awaken one morning to find their cheese is missing. The cheese is an allegorical representation of those things we hold as a high priority for life like your job or perhaps an important relationship. Through their adventures to discover a new food supply, Spencer engagingly outlines the steps we all need to turn the challenge of change into the true opportunity it is. The insert contains 7 bullet points as a reminder of his key points. I think you’ll get the gist of the message. If not, you can get the book. The points are copied below:

  • Change happens – They keep moving the cheese
  • Anticipate change – Get ready for the cheese to move
  • Monitor change – Smell the cheese often so you know when it is getting old
  • Adapt to change quickly – The quicker you let go of old cheese, the sooner you can enjoy new cheese
  • Change – Move with the cheese
  • Enjoy change – Savor the adventure and the taste of new cheese!
  • Be ready to quickly change again and again – They keep moving the cheese

Spencer had a goldmine of an idea with this one. Today, not only is the original book still in demand, but he has created a specialized training curriculum for corporations using this material. Some of the more prominent companies use it with their employees. He’s also come up with specialized editions for teens and kids.

Now the book was very helpful as are the points listed above, but here’s the real question. Is it easier to learn from a story than it is from a list of points? It gets my vote because the bullet list triggered some detailed recollections of the tale, and I read it over 10 years ago. (Sometimes I cannot recall what I had for breakfast, so I’m thinking this is a stellar teaching tool.) Patrick Lencioni also uses this method of teaching business principles by illustrating them in a fictional format. Perhaps there are some who prefer Dragnet’s “Joe Friday” approach of “Just the facts, ma’am,” but the narrative accounts hold my interest and hence boost my retention.  If I understand the plan from the experience of two fictional mice and can remember it, I think I’ll be better able to adjust to change and find the perfect cheese.

Warning for all high school graduates

Since the first days of September, you’ve been thinking about graduation day, but more, perhaps, as a closing, and rightly so. It’s the end of a phase of your education and life. Now things will change. These changes will be far from subtle as were the ones from grade to grade. They will be drastic in comparison, and they’ll come at you fast.

Remember the sing-songy mantra you used to chant at the beginning of summer vacation? “No more pencils, no more books, no more teachers’ dirty looks”? In one sense, your dreams have come true. Seriously. Even if you’re going on to college, those days are gone. Nothing will be the same. Sure, you’ll have classes with pencils (now replaced by technology) and books (now coming with huge price tags and little resale value), but the classroom will change. The teacher’s dirty looks will no longer come as a result of mischievous behavior. Instead, they will challenge your previous 18 years at the core and possibly the entire foundation of your life, especially if you are a Christian or hold traditional values. Are you ready?

Many college professors project a persona of having all of the answers and view you as an unenlightened blank page on which to write their agenda. Their goal is not to see you learn to think so that you can become the innovators of tomorrow; rather, they want you to join them as they espouse their theories of the way the world should be based not on lofty ideals or fact, but on failed programs from the past. Their goal? Land you like a fish – hook, line and sinker. Are you ready?

One thing you’ll learn in your history classes is history repeats itself because people ignore the results achieved the first time around. Sometimes they just rewrite it altogether. I achieved my degree a lot later in life and watched professors distort facts about some of the time periods I had already lived through as an adult. This coupled with the way they changed the events themselves helped me recognize what they could do to young people unless they were prepared. Some of the sources they quoted had fancy names, but no real quantitative results to substantiate their data. To be fair, some of these proponents are only repeating what they had been taught and likely had not done their own research. If I were just coming out of high school, however, I might not have been as well prepared to see through their views. Are you ready?

With today’s ready access to technology, you have resources available to challenge the best classroom orators. Don’t be so quick to toss out your core values. God does not change nor do His principles. If you want to know truth, go to the source. The Bible will not take you down the wrong path. Are you ready?

Just for fun, check out this video to see how things used to be, why they were that way and how things are changing. You or even your parents, just might be a part of making a real difference. BTW — CONGRATULATIONS!

Memorial Day Challenge

How much do you know about Memorial Day? Just for fun, let’s test your knowledge. Take the quiz and check your results. The answers are below. (No cheating, now.)

1. Memorial Day was originally called

a. Fallen Hero’s Day

b. Veteran’s Day

c. Decoration Day

2. The first official celebration of Memorial Day (under its original name), took place 3 years after which war?

a. War of 1812

b. Civil War

c. Spanish American War

3. Moina Michael wrote a Memorial Day poem referencing this flower. Today men and women wear it to honor those who have provided the ultimate sacrifice to secure our freedom.

a. Red rose

b. Red geranium

c. Poppy

4. Which of the following statements is true?

a. On Memorial Day, the flag should be at half-staff until noon only, then raised to the top of the staff.

b. On Memorial Day, the flag should be at full-staff until noon only, then lowered to half-staff until it is removed.

c. On Memorial Day, the flag may fly all day without regard to lowering and removing  it at sundown.

5. The first state to officially recognize Memorial Day is

a. New York

b. Massachusetts

c. Virginia

6. The two most popular items used to honor soldiers are

a. Flags and wreaths

b. Bands and parades

c. Flags and flowers

7. The song most frequently played on Memorial Day is

a. Stars and Stripes

b. Taps

c. Star Spangled Banner

Check your answers below and rate your score. 

Answers:  1-c; 2-b; 3-c; 4-a; 5-a; 6-c; 7-b

7 correct answers Go to the head of the line. The first hot dog is yours.
6 correct answers Good work. You can be second in line.
5 correct answers Memory is getting shaky. Check out the Internet before getting in line.
0-4 correct answers Pop quizzes aren’t your thing. Line up for clean-up duty.

 


Overcoming Murphy’s Law

Does this ever happen to you?  You’re faced with a challenge, you discover a workable solution, and you begin to implement it and WHAM! You’re broadsided by a host of unpredictable situations preventing you from going further with your plan. I often refer to the result as Murphy’s Law – “If anything can go wrong, it will,” because it happens so frequently. Yet in the scheme of life, it is reality. It’s the law, not the exception.

I may be the last of the naïve who, rather than plan for negative possibilities and hindrances, assume that good will triumph according to plan. In many cases it does, but accidents, sickness, financial setbacks and relational issues come to everyone, so I need to change my perspective. In the meantime, I need to plan for these “negative” events, because they surely will come. In so doing, my mind can begin to foresee contingencies and ways to adjust if and when they occur. It really is logical. I’m not sure why it has taken so long to sink into my brain. In some ways, it’s defensive driving for life.

Along with finding a viable solution, I need to put feet to the plan so that I can move forward. (Someone once said that it is easier to direct a moving vehicle than one that is parked.) I need to be moving – even if it is not at the desired speed. This includes a little risk management planning to be really effective, and it may be exactly what I need to overcome Murphy’s Law.