We Need a Little Christmas

christmas-notesWho would have thought that Jerry Herman’s 1966 score, We Need a Little Christmas, from the Broadway musical Mame would hold such relevance in the Christmas 2012 season?

The flamboyant flapper, Auntie Mame – tasked with rearing her orphaned nephew during the dark days of the Great Depression – wondered if things could get any worse. First performed by Angela Lansbury, Auntie Mame demonstrated a vibrant wit and characteristic style. She determines that the situation required a measure of jollity that could only come from Christmas. Although the calendar revealed that it was a week before Thanksgiving – not Halloween as we see today – she overcame this challenge by moving up the celebration  – decking the halls with holly, putting up the tree in the parlor, hanging the stockings and asking Santa to come early.

The lyrics speak of a spirit of hope, though certainly based on the trappings of the season rather that which could provide a true solution. Nevertheless, if you think about it in a symbolic sense, you can gain a measure of substance beyond that which makes you merely feel good.

Auntie Mame demonstrated her positive perspective that the present circumstances were limited and that things would get better. Although her focus was on a symbol rather than the Person from whom all blessings come, she dispelled the negativity of the tragic circumstances that surrounded her by changing her perspective.

I’m not sure what your situation is today, but if the 6 o’clock news holds any validity, heartache and tragedy abound. The economy is not better. Many people are without meaningful work. Doctor’s offices are crammed. It could get you down if you did not look to the babe in the manger – the true “Little Christmas.”

Click here to listen to a more mature Angela Lansbury perform this song.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s